Canfitpro Personal Training Specialist practical evaluation tips

Posted: April 29, 2014 in Sports and Fitness, Strengthening and Conditioning, Uncategorized
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This month, I posted about how to prepare for the Canfitpro – Personal Training Specialist written exam and Tips about the Canfitpro – PTS exam. I already got my certification from Canfitpro as a Personal Training Specialist but it took me a while to post this blog because I got caught up editing my resume and searching for jobs as a Personal Trainer. In any case, here’s the third part of my blog on how to prepare, study, and pass your Canfitpro – Personal Training Specialist certification.

Click the links below for my previous posts about the Canfitpro – Personal Training Specialist written exam:

Reviewing for the Canfitpro – Personal Training Specialist Exam

Passing the Canfitpro – Personal Training Specialist Written Exam

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Canfitpro foundationsI finally was able to take my Canfitpro – Personal Training Specialist practical evaluation exam a couple of weeks ago, a day before Black Friday. It wasn’t as maundy that day because after the long wait and preparation, I passed my Canfitpro – PTS practical evaluation! My wife also passed her G driving license exam, and it was just her first take. If you have passed your Canfitpro – PTS theory exam, then your Canfitpro instructor-trainer will set a schedule with you on when to have your practical evaluation, which is the last part in Canfitpro Personal Training Specialist certification.

I passed my theory exam with a score of 83%the passing score is 80% for the Canfitpro Personal Training Specialist theory exam. The written exam is a combination of multiple choice questions and short answer portions worth 100 points each. I did not take the Canfitpro – Personal Training Specialist course and just studied by myself since I have a degree in Sports Science. I alloted almost a month to study the book and DVD, and answered the Study Guide thrice. Some people I know who did take the Canfitpro – PTS course got scores around 85%, so getting away with 83% without taking the course is considerably good.

canfitpro study guideThe instructor-trainer sent me a congratulatory email indicating that I passed the written part of the certification and instructions on what to expect on the practical part of the certification. I set a schedule to have my practical evaluation after two weeks which I thought was enough time for me to prepare, and also because my instructor-trainer’s schedule limitations. The day finally came and after an hour of the Canfitpro – PTS practical evaluation exam, the instructor-trainer discussed with me my scores, my strengths and weaknesses, my points for improvement, and then congratulated me for passing my practical evaluation and finally being certified as a Canfitpro – Personal Training Specialist. I got a total score of 157 over 160 points which is equivalent to a 98% grade.

I have been teaching Pilates since 2010 and have had an experience in Personal Training in the Philippines, so I am used to the practical part of being a Personal Trainer. The most important thing to do to prepare and pass your Canfitpro – Personal Training Specialist practical evaluation is to practice, practice, and practice.

When you’re done practicing, practice a little more! You’re through with the written part of your exam. That is supposed to test your ‘theory‘ – how much you know about fitness and exercise science. The practical evaluation is to test how good you apply your knowledge to actual situations as a Personal Trainer.
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Here are my tips for passing the Canfitpro – Personal Training Specialist practical evaluation:
Read the instructions carefully. The email that your instructor-trainer will send you after passing your theory exam will contain ALL of the information you need for your practical evaluation. It includes a case study client, and the evaluation form that your instructor-trainer will use on the day of your practical evaluation. Read through your client case, understand each part of the evaluation form and if possible, practice by yourself using the evaluation form.


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Take your time. No matter how badly you want to start your career as a Personal Trainer and get a job, finishing your certification is a crucial step. Someone who took the written exam on the same day I did already scheduled for a job interview, and after the written exam, she was worried because she might not pass the theory part and not get certified in time for her job interview. Take one step at a time, but take each step carefully and excellently! After getting your congratulatory email, think about how long you might need to study and prepare for your practical evaluation – yes, you still need to study and review. You can read from the email which sections of the book Foundations of Personal Training you will need to review.

Practice makes perfect, really. If you haven’t done Personal Training before, practice with a pseudo-client for at least three sessions. Ask a friend or a relative to be your client and ask him/her to observe your teaching techniques and even evaluate you after every session. Use the client card format from Canfitpro to make a real exercise program for your practice. Compute for the HRR and BMI, and use these values to make your program. You will need to bring with you your own client to your practical evaluation, so practicing with a pseudo-client is good because that person will already know what to expect from a training session on the day of your evaluation.

Get the Canfitpro – Foundations of Professional Personal Training here.

Bring a client who is familiar with the gym. You are supposed to bring one client with you on your Canfitpro – PTS practical evaluation. You will use the case-study data given through your email to make a program for your client. Having someone who is familiar with the gym will save you from awkward moments during the practical evaluation and save you time because he or she already knows what to do. For me, I had someone who is taking Kinesiology as my pseudo-client, and she is also a certified personal trainer, so she already knew what to do and what to expect. She even comments hints and clues during my practical evaluation! You don’t need to befriend a Kinesiology student or personal trainer tomorrow to have a pseudo-client. As I’ve said, pracitise with a friend or relative so that your pseudo-client will already have an idea of what you will make him/her do during the practical evaluation.

Translate and communicate. As I have said, the Canfitpro – PTS practical evaluation part is to test how good you are in applying your knowledge to actual situations. Practice talking your pseudo-client through the program: goals, FITT principle for muscular capacity and cardiovascular capacity, muscles used, and flexibility. You can read from the instructions from your email about this – take note of the points you will be graded for and practice. The point of the practical evaluation is to see how you translate exercise science into a language that is understandable to your client.

Practice the physical assessments. My instructor-trainer told me that most people who fail the Canfitpro – PTS practical evaluation flunks the physical assessment part. Don’t be one of them. Study how to do the sit-and-reach test and the 1-minute push up test, and how to interpret the results. Again, translate the data from the physical assessments and communicate well to your client why it is relevant for them. For me, I did a modified sit-and-reach test by doing a V-sit test and using a tape measure that I personally brought. I confidently showed my instructor-trainer that I knew what I was doing, and I interpreted the results to my client. Basically, the table from the book shows a percentile comparison for appropriate age and values. You just have to relate how the fitness results of your client is close to the average, which is the 50th percentile. Match the result with your client’s age and if she’s on a lower percentile (below average, less than 50%) then tell your client that you would want to improve on it. If your client’s result is on the higher percentile (above average, more than 50%) then affirm your client and tell your client the implications of the fitness result.

Buy the Canfitpro – Foundations of Professional Personal Training Study Guide from Amazon.

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Talk the talk. The Canfitpro – Personal Training Specialist practical evaluation will not only test you on how much you know, but on how you communicate to your client. Do you affirm the correct things your client does during the exercise? Do you know how to motivate well? Do you use the right words and cues for each exercise? Practice motivating your pseudo-client and teaching him/her how each exercise should be done, which muscles are targeted or worked on, and the practical uses of each exercise.

Train as if you meant it. Your Canfitpro instructor-trainer will also look for qualities like enthusiasm, confidence, and sincerity in you as a potential Personal Trainer. Internalize the program that you wrote on the client card. Even if you are only helping a pseudo-client, train as if you meant it.

Dress up. Dress like you meant it! Wear comfortable but appropriate clothes. You can wear training shoes, track pants, and a collared shirt on your practical evaluation.

Be yourself. If you have really studied, planned, and prepared for your practical evaluation and you feel that you did everything to be ready, then that’s it! Be confident and just be yourself. It’s important to bring your personality to the table as you go through your session. On a job interview the other day, I was asked by the Fitness Manager to describe what type of a trainer I am, or what is my approach in Personal Training. Develop your own approach and style that fits your personality and characteristics. This will help you be more comfortable as a personal trainer and ace your Canfitpro – Personal Training Specialist practical exam!

Do you think you’re ready to be a Canfitpro Certified Personal Trainer?

You can read my posts about the Canfitpro – Personal Training Specialist written exam from the links here:

Reviewing for the Canfitpro – Personal Training Specialist Exam

Passing the Canfitpro – Personal Training Specialist Written Exam

I hope you found these helpful! Let me know in the comments if you have any questions or how your exam goes!

All the best!


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Comments
  1. […] Canfitpro Personal Training Specialist practical evaluation tips […]

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  2. […] Canfitpro Personal Training Specialist practical evaluation tips […]

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  3. allie says:

    Thanks so much for this post, very helpful. Can you please tell me for the fitness tests, are we required to memorize all the numbers/percentiles or can you refer to the ranges provided in the certification manual?

    Like

    • Billy says:

      You’re welcome. For the fitness tests, I actually printed out a copy of the norms/standard on a small sheet of paper and brought it to the practical exam. They allow you to look at it after doing the fitness test. What’s more important is how you interpret the data to the needs of your client. Good luck!

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  4. bfitz says:

    Thanks for the post!! Did you have a beginer or intermediate client profile and did you include interval training in their cardio workouts? I have my practical on Friday :).

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    • Billy says:

      You’re welcome! How did your written exam go? I can’t exactly remember if ‘Maria’ was a beginner but what I know is that the proctor was not really concerned about the cardio part. You just have to demonstrate a quick warm-up and cardio where you’ll be asked about the target heart rate, RPE, etc. I added an interval workout on my paper but I wasn’t asked about it on the practical itself.

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      • Deep Mala says:

        Hi
        I’m looking for canfitpro personal training exam preparation material like sample questions and answers. Would that include in study guide? I have Foundation Professional Personal Training book.

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      • Coach Billy says:

        Hi,

        Yes the Study Guide is basically a sample questionnaire with answers at the back. There is also a free review website that I linked in a related blog post.

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  5. I have maria, too! Did you use the treadmill or the elliptical for your warm up and cardio? Do you have to calculate the ranges for the target heart rate? (55-64%?)

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    • Billy says:

      I used the treadmill for the warm-up..I was advised that it was the preferred equipment for the practical exam. Canfitpro has a specific recommended HR range – I remember I computed for it but I was told by the examiner to stick to the recommended range. Best of luck!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I guess what I’m asking is, how do you know what speed to set them on? Thanks!

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    • Billy says:

      It depends on your client’s heart rate so ask her to keep her hands on the HR monitor. The examiner will give you around 5 mins for the warmup so you have enough time to raise her HR. Based on experience, a good speed for the average person is 3.0 to 3.5 which is a brisk walking pace. It might be higher if your client is athletic.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. hey sorry, another question. For Maria, did you use the same strength component routine and the same exercises 3x a week? How did you know how many exercises to include. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Billy says:

      No problem,it’s good that you ask questions. 🙂 I wrote down 12 exercises in total that targets almost all muscle groups. The examiner will choose 3 random exercises from your list so you better be sure you know well how to teach all the exercises you put in. I put in different types of routine for each cardio workout (interval, steady state, etc).

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  8. Raj says:

    For the fitness assessment, do you have your client actually perform the assessment or do you show them the two components that they ask for? I have the Push up and sit and reach.

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  9. Tanya says:

    I have my practical on sunday. when it comes to the RPE and % i am drawing a blank, any hints for that at all. I also have Maria.

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    • Billy says:

      RPE stands for Rate of Perceived Exertion, which is a scale of 1 to 20 with 20 being the hardest effort. You can easily look for it in the internet. Regarding the Heart Rate percentage (which I believe is what you meant with “%”), canfitpro have their own values you can find in the book.

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  10. vinny says:

    In terms of the resistance training, it’s said that the examiner will tell you which exercise to perform out of the 16 given. So if you have a beginner client and are told to do a chest press, bicep curl, or tricep extension, would you use machines instead? Considering it is said to use machines for beginners. I’m familiar with both but I’m just wondering what I would be asked to do?

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    • Billy says:

      My examiner allowed me to use machines for all of the exercises…the important things is how you explain which muscle groups are targeted, how to do the exercise, and how to spot.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. GRACIELA says:

    Hello!! My test is tomorrow I also have Maria…BIG QUESTIONS…it says she has been exercising for 6 months ..so ..should I treat her as beginner just because of her fitness assessment results? I mean 12 to 15 reps, 55% to 64% HRMAX?? It says also that she has 121/82 BP do I have to explain something about it?? Thanks a lot!!

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    • Billy says:

      Yes, 6 months of exercising I believe is still considered as a ‘beginner.’ Though I remember my examiner asked me about all of the HR range for all the levels, so just be prepared. I don’t remember anything in particular about the blood pressure with regards to exercise effort. Good luck!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. vinny says:

    Thanks for the info! Great help. I just have one more question regarding sets. For the resistance training aspect how many sets are we expected to make the client perform during the practical. As I’m thinking with the explanations of the benefits of each main part, and demonstration that you may have very little time. Also what do you think is a good cardio training exercise to perform for the practical?

    Thank you!

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    • Billy says:

      Just one set for each exercise — the examiner just wants to see how you teach specific exercises she chooses…and that’s correct, you have little time so you should keep explaining as much as you can for almost every repetition 🙂 the point I guess is more of impressing the examiner than having your client do a good workout. For the cardio, my examiner actually asked me to do both the bike and the treadmill. Good luck!

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  13. vinny says:

    For the program breakdown on the program card, did you make them do all 12 exercises on the same day or split the program?

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  14. Rhea says:

    Hi there Billy!

    I am browsing the web and found your blog page… very interesting and helpful. I have registered to take the PTS course in 2 weeks, because I began teaching fitness class 5 months ago. I need to take a CanFitPro certification course (and of course pass it) to move forward and have better/solid career in fitness, though this is a hobby-interest path for me. I have a full time job, very contented and well compensated but I just love being in the fitness realm. I have 2 major concerns; 1. I have few, if not, very minimal knowledge of human kinetics, i.e., muscle groups and heart/cardio component; 2. I am 45 years old female, with 4 kids and very busy but fulfilling family life. Do you think I have a good chance of passing the written and practical exams? Your honest opinion will be appreciated. Thank you so much for all that you do. You’re inspiring enough…

    Liked by 1 person

    • Billy says:

      Hi Rhea, welcome to my blog and thank you for your kind words! Good job for being determined to improve yourself even in a “hobby-interest” path! The Fitness Industry is definitely exciting, challenging, and fulfilling.

      Are you training one-on-one clients or group fitness classes? There are two different Canfitpro certifications: PTS for one-on-one Personal Training, and FIS (Fitness Instructor Specialist) for group fitness instructors.

      The written exam requires knowledge of at least the major (and most common) muscle groups, and which strength training exercises target them. If you are familiar with them already, then I believe you have a good chance of passing the written exam. The book helped me a lot when I reviewed for the exam. You are taking the Canfitpro course which would give you more confidence. I’m sure you’d ace the Practical exam since you have already been teaching! Make sure you’re familiar with the exercise machines.

      I have a feeling that you are a very determined, intelligent, and strong 45yo mom. With enough persistence and patience, you have a good chance of getting certified!

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  15. vinny says:

    Hey Billy,
    Just wanted to say thanks for all your help! I passed my practical exam today with a 97%. Wouldn’t have done it without your help!

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    • Billy says:

      That. Is. Awesome!!! You are very much welcome, and thank you for visiting back to say thanks!! Congratulations on the first step of your journey as a Personal Trainer. Good luck in your career! Stay in touch!

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  16. GRACIELA says:

    Just to say thanks Billy and also to let the rest know that in my practical test for PT the instructor did not allowed me to use any machines because she said MARIA was an Intermediate client, so she asked me to demonstrate the exercises using dumbbells. For my program card I did use 55% to 64% HRR for CARDIO and also compound and single joint exercises with ball and dumbbells. She didn’t asked me to show any of those. Make sure to tell them what muscle you are working and if it is a single or compound exercise….I knew all of them but I was so nervous that in some cases I was so focus in the cues and the breathing instructions that I forgot to mentioned it. Also jump first in the treadmill or elliptical and show your client how to use it before instructed them to get in it. I passed with 91%. Good luck to everyone.

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    • Billy says:

      Hi Graciela, youre welcome…and Congratulations!!!

      I guess the take away here is to be ready…things will be different for the practical depending on your examiner. I had Maria but we did not do free weights. My examiner actually expected me to teach the machines. I remember I was also asked about single and compound exercises. Those are good points!

      Good luck in your career! Keep in touch!

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  17. christy says:

    When you have to describe muscles used can you use “Hamstrings” or do you have to list off the muscles in that group? Did you have to manually monitor heart rate during cardio? How do you do that if they are walking ( without comprimising the clients stability) and did they make you check it manually every 2 min? Do you have to do the push up assessment if your client has lower back issues?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Billy says:

      Hi Christy!
      • You can describe muscles as Hamstrings or whichever muscle group. The exam includes major muscle groups only and you dont need to be specific.
      • For the cardio part of the practical, choose a machine that can measure the heart rate like the treadmill. You dont have to worry about getting the heart rate manually. What you need to know for cardio is the RPE.
      • You will be the one selecting the client for your practical exam, so i suggest dont get anyone with a condition that could significantly affect your exam 🙂 In case it cant be avoided, you have to know how to modify and correct the push up so it doesnt trigger lower back pain.

      Hope it helps!

      Like

  18. Amanda says:

    Hey Billy,

    I know what values to use for the heart rate during cardio depending on the client’s fitness level, but I cannot find anywhere in the manual what the heart rate should be during the warm-up.

    Thank in advance for the help,
    Amanda

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    • Billy says:

      Hi Amanda, you should find it from the Study Guide but at a standard, warmup should be 50-60% of THR or about 120bpm.

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      • Hi Billy,

        Thanks for this, all the questions have been helpful. Mine is about the Program Card. It asks for ‘Cardiorespiratory Training Guidelines’ and then asks for ‘Workout 1, Workout 2, and Workout 3’. Are these supposed to be 3 separate cardio workouts, resistance training workouts, or a combination? And if so, is there a specific combination they are looking for?

        Thanks Billy

        Nathan

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      • Billy says:

        Hi Nathan,

        You’re welcome!

        Sorry for the late response, man..been a little busy these past days at the gym. Anyway, they all refer to the CARDIORESPIRATORY workouts –it does not refer to any resistance/weight training. So for example, Workout 1 will be STEADY STATE which is 25 minutes at 60% THR, RPE of 12. Workout 2 will be INTERVAL TRAINING on the bike, 40 seconds at 75 to 80% of THR followed by 20 seconds at 60%. Workout 3 can be cardio on the rowing machine, etc.

        My instructor did not really ask anything about the Cardio guidelines during the practical exam – after the warm-up on the treadmill, we proceeded to the resistance workouts. Hope it helps!

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  19. Nathan says:

    Hi Billy,

    All of these questions are great, thanks. Mine is about the program card: 2 questions – 1. It asks for Cardiorespiratory Training Guidelines, then underneath says Workout 1, Workout 2, and Workout 3. Are these supposed to be 3 different cardio workouts, strength workouts, or a combination? And 2. What should be included in the Training Guidelines at the beginning.

    Thanks a bunch!
    Nathan

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  20. Alex says:

    Billy I think your Blog id Brilliant thank you so Much, in the Practical you think you can use a HR monitor for the client assistant with you or doesn’t make sense?

    Like

    • Billy says:

      Hi, thank you for reading and for the comment. I appreciate it! You don’t need to use an HR monitor during the exam — they actually need to see how you get the pulse/heart rate of your client and assess the target heart rate.

      Like

  21. ptd says:

    Hi Billy great site lots of valuable information. I have my practical exam next week and i have a question about the program card as it isn’t too specific about what we need to fill out.
    What are they looking for when they ask for training guidelines or cardiorespiratory guidelines? Do they want you to fill in the rep range, HR target etc?
    Also there’s a program breakdown section under training guidelines which i’m not sure about.
    Lastly on the dates, do i write stuff like upper body workout – monday, lower body workout wed, full body friday?

    Thanks in advance for your help!

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    • Billy says:

      Hi Peter, thanks for reading! I agree, the Program card wasn’t very clear but the Training guidelines is simply your instructions for your client. For example you can just say “Do cardio for up to 30 minutes and cool down for 10 minutes” or “Rest for at least 30 seconds after every set for Strength training,” etc. For the dates, you got it right – you can just write down the strength training focus for each workout. Good luck on your exam!

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  22. ptd says:

    awesome thanks for the quick response!

    I have one last question and that is on the marking scheme sheet. For the main exercises there’s 5 marks for “correctly demonstrate and coach the exercise discussing correct ROM, posture, regression and progression and 3 key set up and teaching points”

    my question is what are they referring to in terms of regression and progression and 3 key set up points? Thanks so much for your help i greatly appreciate it

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    • Billy says:

      No problem, my pleasure to help! For example you’re demonstrating the Goblet Hold Squat: 1)regression would be to do a box squat or limited ROM (half squat) 2) progression would be to do extend the arms forward to alter the centre of gravity. If I remember it right, the ‘training variables’ are in the book as well – those are the ones you can use to progress or regress like proprioception, balance, weight, ROM, etc.

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  23. Paul says:

    Hi Billy,

    Don’t think my previous email went through.

    My question was for the sit and reach test. How was this performed exactly and what did you use for tools? Any tips for this area most detailed would be great, same for push up protocol.

    Also for measuring RPE, are they looking for you to use 6-20? or Modified borg scale? Or can you just use your own 1-10?

    Let me know thanks!

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    • Billy says:

      Hi Paul,

      Sorry for the late response, just got stacked in the gym today.

      I got your previous message but there was some error before I got to finish reading it. Anyway, I just did a modified sit and reach test — that is without the box. And yes, this is where you use the tape measure. So just ask your partner to sit on the floor against a wall and have their legs spread wide and straight. Have them reach forward as far as they can and measure the distance from that point to the wall using the tape measure. You can ask them to sit on the tape measure before they start, or just mark the spot they reached and measure afterwards.

      For the RPE, the examiner just wants to see that you memorized the equivalent value for each number according to the actual 6-20 scale.

      For the 1-minute push up, keep in mind the important pointers for the form and know when to stop the test. So when your partner starts to shake or drops their hip, etc then it’s their final rep.

      Hope it helps!

      Like

  24. Paul says:

    Hi again Billy!

    I was curious as the flow of the exam. They give you the evaluation form ahead of time to know how you will be marked. Are we suppose to memorize this flow? So for example, “Starting the personal training session” is the first section. Next is Fitness Assessments and so on. Are they expecting you to remember the exact flow or will the teacher tell you this section is what we are doing next and so on? Do they allow you to keep the evaluation form in front of you? Any tips to this would be great! thanks again. Exam is in two days so getting nervous lol

    Like

    • Billy says:

      Hi Paul,

      Yes you have to follow the exact flow based on the form they gave you. You can’t bring it with you but the examiner would give you a hint anyway of what’s supposed to be next. I’m sure you’ll do great! Good luck!!!

      Like

  25. Paul says:

    Hey Billy,

    Just wanted to thank you for the helpful tips! I ended up passing today and did exceptionally well.

    Thanks again and take care.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Amy says:

    I happened to find your blog while searching for tips on the practical Canfitpro exam, and so happy I did! Not only was the original post well written, but the comments/replies were extremely helpful. I do my exam tomorrow and feeling a little less nervous and a little more prepared. Thank you!!

    Like

  27. lildragn says:

    HIya Billy, great write up! I have my practical tomorrow and the only thing hanging me up is taking the heart rate/pulse manually… I know how to do it, but I can’t seem to find Canfitpro’s calculation for this… they’re many out there such as how many pulses in 10 secs x 6 for example. Any idea where I can find this info in the manual? Thx!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Coach Billy says:

      Hi, you can actually use any of the stuff you see from the internet. My preferred is to count the pulse for 20 seconds then multiply by 3. This won’t be a major thing in the practical exam, they only want to see if you know how to measure your client’s heart rate manually after the Fitness tests. Hope it helps!

      Like

  28. monke says:

    Hey Billy,

    Love the blog and certainly love the information, I was wondering usually how long does this whole practical test last? is it 1 hour? 2 hours? would greatly appreciate a reply back thanks!

    Like

  29. Angie Wedge says:

    Hello. I am taking the practical in a couple of days – I challenged the written based on previous educational experience so I have a canfitpro specific question – When I am filling out the Client training card what is meant by “Set Performance”? I find each organization has their own terms and I want to be sure about what is required here. Thank you so much 🙂

    Like

  30. Shalu. says:

    Very helpful. Thank you very much.

    Like

  31. Joseph says:

    Hey Billy. This page helped me out a lot in gaining some knowledge for my upcoming practical exam. My main concern is filling out the periodized training program card. I have Maria as my case study client and I understand that I have to show how I will progress her through the mesocycles so I’m just asking if you have any tips and what criteria they’re looking for particularly. Thanks in advance.

    Like

    • Coach Billy says:

      Hi Joseph, I’m glad my stuff helped! If you have the book, you can see some examples from there on how to progress (or regress) the exercises apart from increasing the weight; some of it are to change the grip (wide, narrow, overhand, etc), do the exercise on one leg, close the eyes (to improve balance and proprioception), do a superset, adjust tempo, hold, decrease rest periods, etc. My tip is to keep it simple with the progressions. Also, you don’t need to progress every single exercise you give to Maria. You can for example ask her to add isometric holds to an exercise like on the bottom position of the squat; another example is to slow down the eccentric phase on the shoulder raises. Be creative and keep it simple. Good luck on your exam and all the best to your career!

      Like

  32. Krista says:

    Hi Billy,

    Your blog has been very helpful. The one thing that is throwing me off with the Case Study for Maria is that it states she works as a teacher and will be going back to school part-time as well. She has limited time to train, however she plans to meet with her trainer 3 times per week. I’m trying to determine how many resistance training sessions vs. cardio training sessions I should do in a week as she has time constraints. I originally planned on her completing cardio on her ‘off’ days and doing the resistance training 3 times per week with the trainer.

    Does anyone have any suggestions?

    Thanks! 🙂

    Like

    • Coach Billy says:

      Hi Krista,

      Im glad to know my blog helped! You can indicate that she can do cardio before or after your training sessions. Suggesting to complete her cardio on her ‘off’ days is also acceptable, and you could add circuit or HIIT workout on her resistance training day as well.

      Hope it helps!

      Like

  33. Joseph says:

    Hey Billy Thanks for the reply! My main concern is actually filling out the Periodized program card itself. I’m not sure what information to put under the Macro, Mesocycle section & the Microcycle sections under FITT (Resistance Training) & FITT (Cardio Training) for a 52 week Macrocycle. Any help would be appreciated.

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