Posts Tagged ‘exercises’


TRX RIP Training
What is the TRX suspension trainer?
The TRX suspension trainer is the most versatile piece of equipment that anyone can use in the gym, office, or even in your own home! It is very portable and compact yet the exercises can be challenging. Regardless of your fitness level, TRX is a perfect tool for body weight exercises. The TRX training system was created by Randy Hetrick, a former U.S. Navy Seal who wanted to continue developing his physical fitness while on the field. He developed a strap system that can be attached almost anywhere stable to provide resistance exercises using bodyweight. Because the Navy Seals are always on the go, the exercises of the TRX system is best for people who want to workout with limited space and a minimum amount of time.

How does the TRX suspension trainer work?
The TRX suspension trainer offers anyone the same amount of world class workouts for whole body conditioning, anytime you want and anywhere you want to go. It is like having your gym in a bag! You can do different exercises using the TRX suspension trainer that works the whole body and develops strength, flexibility, balance and coordination to improve your performance. The TRX suspension trainer has a multiple anchoring system that you can attach anywhere so you can continue toning up and working out even if you’re in your home, office, or hotel.

The TRX suspension trainer is a very flexible tool that you can use to work out your core and burn calories with intense exercises for maximum calorie burn in less time. This is because transition from one exercise to another is quick and easy! Unlike in the gym where you have to set up plates, bars, and equipment, TRX allows many different exercises while using just one tool. You don’t have to line up to wait for your turn on gym equipment. Just attach your TRX suspension trainer to a pole or doorpost and you can do your own circuit workout!

Shop TRX Training Bundle Now!

Can I use the TRX suspension trainer?
TRX suspension trainer has been used by MMA fighters, professional athletes, and competitive bodybuilders because it delivers results efficiently and effectively. It has also been featured in the Biggest Loser and has proven itself to be an effective workout equipment even for people who want to start in fitness or if your goal is to lose weight. It is a trusted tool by professional coaches and trainers which ensures that it will help you to reach your fitness goals.

Watch the video below for more information about the TRX suspension trainer and see the TRX in action!

What kind of Suspension Training should I get?
If you are someone who is looking for a dynamic bodyweight workout that you can do in your home, get the TRX Home suspension Trainer and anchor, you’ll also receive a workout guide and 6 bonus workouts for 15 to 30 minute sessions. It will help you build lean muscle and burn fat as you workout with just your body weight! TRX will work your core muscles, chest, and even legs and improve your flexibility and endurance.

If you are a trainer or coach who is looking for creative and effective sports conditioning tool, get the TRX Pro Suspension Training Kit which includes videos and workout cards. It also includes workout programs for your clients or team.

If you want to level up in strengthening your core, the Rip Trainer is for you! The Rip Trainer is an innovative system that helps you develop core strength, power, flexibility, and endurance. It is also a portable device that anyone can use anywhere! The Rip Trainer is a functional training tool with exercises that can easily mimic movements in sports and everyday life. It will help you build core strength and burn calories by challenging your body with unequal loads.

Get your TRX suspension training system now! Click the photo link below:




Become a TRX Trainer

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If you are an office worker who is dedicated to running but your low back pain from long hours of sitting keeps you from achieving more, then read ahead!

How do you run with pain?

You don’t have to!

The sacroiliac joints – the bones that connect the lowest tip of your spine (sacrum) to your hip bones (iliac) – are considered a source of most lower back pain when your hip becomes compressed, or if there is asymmetry or misalignment of the hips which leads to joint dysfunction and subsequent pain. Compression of the pelvis occurs when seated for a long time, and rotation of the hips occurs in both cycling and running, and combining these two factors can be the cause of low back pain. An especially significant correlation can be seen between low back pain and lack of internal hip rotation mobility.

The development of asymmetry in the hips and improper muscle lengths in the hip rotator muscles can be caused by frequently assumed postures, like sitting for long periods or time or being bent over on a bicycle for hours in the saddle.

This was important to know, and a key to the secret of eliminating the low back pain.

The book “Run With No Pain” is the official, easy and practical step-by-step exercise routine for eliminating low back pain in athletes and includes over 30 exercise videos that teach you exactly how to implement each section of the program.

If you’ve been going to Physiotherapist or a Chiropractor for your pain, then this eBook is definitely much cheaper!

Download it from amazon to your kindle or iPad for only $7.66!

strength training


 

Plyometrics, or ‘jump training’ is a technique that aims to increase muscular strength and power. The focus of the exercises is powerful movements. It was originally designed for Olympic athletes but recently, it has become a popular workout routine for recreational athletes and even fitness enthusiasts of all ages.

 

Plyometricstraining is composed of dynamic resistance exercises with a stretch a muscle (eccentric phase) and then rapidly shortening it (concentric phase). Hopping and jumping exercises, for example, subject the quadriceps to a stretch-shortening cycle that can strengthen these muscles, increase vertical jump, and reduce the force of impact on the joints.

 

SHOP
Plyometric training often is used to condition professional and amateur adult athletes because the movements mimic those used in sports such as skiing, tennis, football, basketball, volleyball, and boxing.
 

Watch the video below to understand more about Plyometricsand use it to your advantage!


 

 

Learn about how to do Plyometrics at home for only $0.99. Download this eBook from Amazon:

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JacobHillerJumpAd120x240Jacob Hiller is a Performance Enhancement Coach who has been developing vertical jump explosion techniques for over ten years and training coaches and athletes to maximize their potential. He has trained high school, college, NBA, and Olympic athletes, and professional dunkers. He has consistently helped athletes to gain 40+ verticals.
 

How To Jump45MInutes3D
 

He developed a program complete with instructional, demo videos, and more that can be easily accessed through the internet!

Watch one of his videos here giving some exercises on how to jump higher:

 

 

Click here NOW to learn more about this amazing program and get access to his techniques on how to jump 10 inches higher!
 

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Let me know in the comments section if you’re interested in getting a sample workbook for FREE. 🙂

 

 

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All of our movements come from the core – the muscles that connects from the shoulders, trunk, and hips. Working out the core muscles will result in significant athletic performance and lessen the risk of injury. The goal for core conditioning is to have the muscle groups of the core work synergistically as one.


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Engaging your core as you run, walk, bike and even swim will help you move more efficiently. The core prevents unnecessary movements and transfers your energy to your running stride, pedalling stroke, or your swimming. According to a study by Sato and Mokha (2009), performing four sessions per week of Core Strength Training shows a significant effect on running performance and running times. It also helped the subjects become more conscious of body position and had good posture while running.

The body is designed to work systematically – all muscles are connected to each other, and functions more efficiently when moving in conjunction to another. The core muscles should be strong enough to support any movement done by the extremities.

Here is an exercise routine that is sure to work out your core:

Core strengthening workout<

Do a basic warm-up for 5 minutes
Squats with roundhouse 15 repetitions
Mountain climber <20 repetitions each side
Cross-crunch get ups 20 repetitions each side
Shoulder bridge Hold for 30 seconds
Scorpion push-ups 15 repetitions
Superman 20 repetitions
Do it for 4 to 5 sets, resting for 30 seconds after each exercise, and for 2 minutes after each set.

 

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Optimum massThe mixed smell of iron, sweat, and rust wasn’t really lovely but I guess my olfactory nerves eventually got accustomed to it. I first took up Weight Training class as my second P.E. of choice, thinking that improving my anaerobic capacity would be of more benefit for me since I have asthma. I thought that getting stronger first would be better for me, before I undertake physical activities that require more aerobic component (The next P.E. I was thinking of taking was Swimming. If you’ve read Part 1, you’ll know why). However – having no background in sports training – it was in that class that I was first able to understand, apply, and experience the Principles of Training.


Here are some of the Principles of Training that would help you train better as well:

  • Individuality. I knew how un-fit I was and I wanted to improve and get stronger. This principle may be one of the most gracious – it implies that each person or athlete has their own individual differences, and the training program must consider those differences. What worked for one person might not work for another. You can’t simply copy what the other person does in the gym and expect the same results in the same time. For a long time -and even until now – coaches have been implementing a ‘one size fits all’ approach to training, sometimes even copying the training program of a winner’s team. This might result to undue load and stress to the athlete.

    Physiological, social, and psychological differences must be considered before doing a training program. I learned about the different somatotypes or body types – the endomorph, mesomorph, and ectomorph. I was somewhere in between an endomorph and a mesomorph, so I should not expect to look skinny like an ectomorph, and I ought to capitalize on my own somatotype. I also realized that I work out better when I am on my own, or at least have my personal space in the gym. Some people won’t work out without a ‘workout buddy’ or a ‘spotter’ – for me, I am able to focus more when there’s no one looking.

    An individualized training program will help the person or the athlete achieve improvements in strength and performance more efficiently. If you are training with a group of people, modifications can be incorporated for your individual needs. Last but not the least, be realistic and set goals according to your individuality.

  • Specificity. This is also known as the SAID principle – Specific Adaptations to Imposed Demands. This simply means that our bodies adapt to the specific mode of training and stress that we put into it. If you swim, you’ll get faster and stronger at swimming but you won’t be improving at another skill, say, throwing. This means that you have to work the same muscle groups that work for the movement or skill that you want to improve. Also, you have to be specific to the type of training that you will be doing, if it will be aerobic or anaerobic in nature.

    For me, I didn’t improve much of my aerobic capacity when I started because I just focused on lifting weights and training for Powerlifting. If you’re just doing weights at the gym, you won’t develop your legs or any other part of your body if you just do bicep curls.

  • posterior chain

  • Progressive Overload. This may be my ‘favourite’ principle among the list. It suggests that to see improvements in training, a person must exceed the level of stress applied to the body that he/she is accustomed to. You must do more than what you are used to doing so that you will see the results you want to see. Challenge yourself every workout. Give your maximum effort, and may be even a little more. But as much as overloading our system is important, we should remember to do it progressively. The body adapts to the gradual increase of stress placed on the body during training. Additional load can be applied either to Volume – the amount of repetitions that you do the exercise; or the Intensity – the amount of effort to maximal that you apply to do the exercise.
  • Detraining (Reversibility). Our body is designed very well to adapt that it even adapts even if we do nothing! This principle is sometimes referred to as the “use it or lose it” principle. Studies show that athletes who stop their sports and training eventually loses the fitness and skill components over time. You lose fitness when you stop exercising and how quickly you lose fitness depends on factor such as your fitness level when you stopped, how long you’ve been exercising, and how long you stopped. For conditioned athletes, studies show that they become detrained after three months of not exercising. However, for sedentary and beginning athletes, studies shows that stopping exercise only after two months brought them back to their original fitness level!

    All of us has reasons to stop exercising or training for a while. This principle reminds us to take it easy whenever we go back to training. During college and being part of the Powerlifting team, there were many times that I had to stop training for a few weeks and even a couple of months because I needed to study for an exam or finish a paper. This principle works with progressive overload because I had to go back to lighter loads and progress again before training for another competition. The good news according to research is that athletes and more trained individuals are able to retrain faster even after a long break.

  • Recovery. Last but definitely not the least is the Principle of Rest and Recovery. This principle of rest applies to both the short rest needed in between exercise sets and the longer time intervals of several hours up to 2 days after an intense workout. Our bodies need time to recover from the loads and stresses of training and even competition for it to adapt. The body repairs and strengthens itself during this time out period – muscles add up (or enlarge) fibers, additional neurons get recruited, and the capacity of your heart and lungs improve. Apart from the physiological, this principle also allows for psychological adaptations.

     

    powerful recovery

     

    Exercise or any physical work damages and breaks down the tissues in our bodies, and intense activity depletes energy stores. Overtraining and not giving the body enough time to repair these tissues and replenish lost energy would then be detrimental to training and might even result to injury. There are times that we can get too hyped up to work out, join races weekly, and cause our body to be overtrained. Remember that Recovery is as important as training – it is during the Recovery period that your body gets stronger and adapts to the stress of training.

  • Applying these Principles of Training definitely helped me improve my strength and performance in my sport. I was able to know if I’m doing too little or too much, and which exercises and type of training would be the best for my sport. Considering these things is important in making an effective training program and achieving fitness and athletic goals.

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    Pilates Myths

    Posted: August 25, 2013 in Pilates
    Tags: , , ,

    I’m sharing this article named “Top 5 Myths About Pilates” from About.com (I’m reblogging it here so you can read the article without the ads, but you can check the link). Read this to help you understand Pilates more. 🙂

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    The increasing popularity of Pilates is a wonderful thing, but like the game Telephone where the meaning of a phrase gets distorted as it is passed along, as word spreads about Pilates, so have some ideas about it that aren’t serving anybody. Here a few of the myths about Pilates that can send Pilates folks into mild hysteria, if not full-on conniptions.


    ►Myth 1. Pilates is a derivative of yoga.

    Ah, this one is causing a gnashing of teeth for both Pilates and yoga practitioners, especially teachers who have students come in thinking that yoga and Pilates are interchangeable. Pilates is not a derivative of yoga. While Joseph Pilates studied many fitness and body/mind disciplines, and may have been exposed to yoga, there is actually no historical evidence that he studied yoga seriously. While Pilates and yoga are very complimentary practices, they are also very different.


    ►Myth 2. Pilates is just a quick fix for flabby abs.

    Well, the truth in this one is that Pilates is a fix for flabby abs. Pilates is well-known for flattening tummys. The reason is that Pilates does focus on working from the core, especially the deeper abdominal muscles. Toning the abdominal and pelvic floor muscles provides stability and freedom of motion throughout the body. This is also one of the reasons that Pilates has been so successful for people who have back pain.

    However, Pilates does not stop at abdominal work at all. Structural integration, and learning to create a flexible, strong body that can move freely and efficiently are important goals of Pilates fitness. To this end, Pilates works all body parts in a very balanced way, not just the abs..

    The Pilates method is also a practice of mind/body fitness. Developing a body that works as a harmonious whole requires much more than a calisthenic or spot reduction approach to fitness. The Pilates principles – control, centering, concentration, breath, flow, and precision all support an integrative mind/body experience through Pilates exercise.


    ►Myth 3. Pilates is easy, for wimps.

    Hold it while I count to 10, do my breathing exercises, and visualize peace! I’ve been hearing this easy Pilates rumor around lately and it just about sends me into orbit.

    I think the idea that Pilates is easy comes from a few places. First, Pilates is very adaptable. It can be easy or very hard, depending on the needs of the individual. The ability to modify exercises for different populations is actually one of the greatest strengths of Pilates. Second, the soaring popularity of Pilates has meant that there are many beginner Pilates classes in practically every gym and studio around the country. This is a good thing, but it also means that people are not necessarily exposed to the intermediate and advanced levels of Pilates. Third, Pilates exercises are often done slowly. There is an emphasis on awareness and control that can make an exercise look easy to the casual observer.

    I can think of other reasons that Pilates might seem to be easy. It is a popular form of exercise for pregnant women, it is used in rehabilitation, and people of all ages and sizes can do Pilates. Nevertheless, I assure you that the Pilates method presents ongoing challenges for even the fittest athletes (with whom Pilates is also very popular.


    ►Myth 4. Pilates is mostly for women.

    Pilates has never been “just for women” and its benefits are certainly not gender biased. After all, Pilates was developed by a man, Joseph Pilates, who is said to have been a rather macho man at that. Joe was a gymnast, a boxer, and a military trainer in his early years, and pictures of Pilates even into his eighties, reveal a very strong, fit physique. Men have always played an important role in maintaining the Pilates work and shaping its evolution.

    It is true that Pilates is very popular with women, but there is nothing about Pilates that makes it more for women than for men. The adaptability of the Pilates method to different levels of fitness and body types has made Pilates an accessible and effective fitness choice for women. Also, Pilates has attracted a large number of dancers, especially women, and many of them have chosen Pilates as a next career. More women teachers has made Pilates more attractive to women students. Both of these factors may have contributed to a somewhat feminized perception of Pilates. Fortunately, now that the Pilates method is becoming so well accepted in fitness, more men are showing up in studios and training programs.


    ►Myth 5. Anyone can teach Pilates with a little book and DVD study, or a short workshop.

    There is an unfortunate truth in this. Pilates instruction is not regulated at the moment and anybody who wants to can claim to be teaching Pilates. But that’s as far as it goes. Pilates is a sophisticated method of exercise and a qualified instructor will have had a lot of education and apprentice experience.

    The education to teach Pilates mat exercises is often just a weekend course, but this should be preceded by extensive time spent as a student. Full Pilates instructor education is much more extensive, requiring the study of anatomy, special populations, teaching skills, and all of the Pilates equipment and mat exercises. Most Pilates instructors have good training, but since the industry is not regulated it is up to the consumer to ask questions and be a discerning student, and the responsibility of prospective instructors to be sure that they have adequate education before teaching a class