Posts Tagged ‘life’

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In a fitness enthusiast’s ideal world, this would be the every-day checklist forever:

> Wake-Up
> Workout
> Repeat

Unfortunately, that world doesn’t exist.
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Our schedules get messed up, we get sick, projects take longer than expected, injuries and emergencies happen, and so on. It doesn’t even have to be a negative reason to miss workouts.
I have had clients who miss weeks and months of training due to work promotion or because their business is booming, or because they have to welcome a new family member, or simply because they have to go on a nice vacation on a sunny island.

There could be numerous reasons for this fantasy checklist to not exist.

Sometimes it gets frustrating especially when you were keeping up a pretty impressive routine, then it suddenly had to stop.

Thankfully, you don’t have to sulk in despair – it won’t do any good, anyway. If for any reason you had to take a recess from training, here are some things to keep in mind when it’s time to get back on track:

1.) Go Easy.
I know, you want to jump straight to when you left off. You weren’t away for so long anyway, so why not?
You may be familiar with the Training Principle called “Progressive Overload” which states that your strength and conditioning increases slowly and gradually as you keep overloading the stimulus (exercise). Well, you may not have heard of the Principle of Reversibility, which as it name implies, means that any adaptation that has taken place as a result of your training will be reversed once you stop training!
The speed at which reversibility happens depend on a lot of factors, but even pro-athletes are not exempted! On average, training loss occurs at about one-third the rate of the gains. Some sports skills can be lost in one to two weeks.

The good news is, reversibility stops once you get back to training! But the best way is to take the Principle of Progressive Overload into consideration.

Start easy but challenging, then go from there.

2.) Build your Base.
Base strength refers not just to how much your muscles can lift, or how long your heart can keep pumping, but also includes your ligaments, tendons, joints, and bones. These guys take a little longer time to adapt and recover to the stresses of training, and are more subtle. Avoid high-intensity movements that involve a lot of jumping, plyometrics, fast movements, or heavy maximum lifts. If you took the time off because of an injury, you should even be more careful.

3.) Take your Time.
The longer your break was, the more time you need to give yourself to come back to where you left off. Unless you have an upcoming competition, or a deadline to show your six-pack, you don’t need to rush! Other factors such as fitness level, age, body type, health history, and so on affects the time it will take for you to get back. Remember that exercise is also physical stress to your body, and doing it too much too quickly can cause more harm than good.

Make small progressive increments. Consistency is the key to success, and patient hard work pays off.

********************

It happens to everyone.
Even elite athletes fall off their training.
Life just has its ups and downs.
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Remember that the goal of your training is to improve your quality of life. If life happens, then so be it. Get back to training and you know that you’ll reap the rewards of a physically active lifestyle in its time.

“Squats are like life.
It’s about standing up when something
heavy keeps you down.”

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Before anything else, watch this 77-year old woman lift heavier than you do!
“I never used the words “I can’t”…I would just say “I will try.” That’s how I lived my life, just trying to do my best – everyday.
 
I can do what I need to do, and I’m proud of it…
…I can shovel my own driveway when it snows, thanks to the power-training.
…my grandchildren, I can lift them up without any problem.
…and the best of all, I don’t need any help when I carry my groceries.
 
That’s what [lifting] is about – it’s about life.”
 
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
 
Who says you have to stop lifting after hitting a certain age?
 
Willie Murphy, the strong woman on the video, started lifting weights at age 50.
One of the largest determinants in quality of life and functional independence is STRENGTH. Unfortunately, a lot of people who were once strong suddenly stop when they hit 70, 60, 50, and some even 40 or younger.
A lot of functional everyday movements which are relevant especially as we age are based on STRENGTH:
– walking, climbing stairs, etc.
– sitting down and standing up.
–  carrying groceries, kids, etc.
– keeping our balance.
At the gym I work at as a Personal Trainer, I focus on helping people with muscle or joint pains be able to exercise pain-free. Most of these people – both men and women- are aged 50 and over. They come to me with these Top 3 goals in mind:
1) To get stronger.
2) To improve stamina/endurance.
3) To lose some weight.
I’ve had people who just started going to the gym later in life. I’ve had people who had been active before, maybe played some sports when they were younger, but had an injury or life just happened and stopped, but wanted to get back.
It is possible to ‘get back’ to being physically active.
It is  beneficial to be active and get stronger especially later in life.
Just like Willie, always keep a perspective of ‘trying.’ Try to do your best everyday. Try to be better most days. Just try.
You will not know what your body is capable of until you try. With proper guidance and training, you can succeed to be better and get stronger, even over 50.
Lifting is not just about losing weight, or looking good… it’s about improving your quality of LIFE.

Never EVER let your mistakes bring you down. They say experience is the best teacher and we can learn from our mistakes. Remember that there is always a second chance – another chance to improve, to do better, and to succeed.

Just look at this soccer player from Maldives, Ashad Ali Adubarey. He had this chance to score a goal for his team with a penalty kick – a one on one match between him and the goal keeper. While running towards the ball, he slipped and lost his momentum. But that did not stop him. He quickly got up and continued a few more steps toward the ball. He proceeded to kick, and scored a goal to beat Afghanistan. Some reporters say that he intentionally feigned the fall, but you could watch the video for yourself to see for yourself if it was a total wipe out or a fake.

The point is that, even after such a bad fall, we can always get up and try harder.

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