Posts Tagged ‘posterior chain’

ca_468x60_giftcertificates
This post is adapted from Matt Fitzgerald‘s article. He’s the author of RUN: The Mind-Body Method of Running by Feel (VeloPress, 2010) and an expert training content developer for PEAR Sports. Learn more at mattfitzgerald.org
=============================================================================

Garmin Forerunner 10 GPS Watch (Pink/White)

Buy now

Garmin Forerunner 210 Water Resistant GPS Enabled Watch without Heart Rate Monitor

Buy now

Garmin Forerunner 310XT Waterproof Running GPS With USB ANT Stick and Heart Rate Monitor

Buy now

Garmin Forerunner 10 GPS Watch (Black/Red)

Buy now

There’s a reason Olympic runners have coaches—the same reason you may need one.

   Meb Kelfezighi has a coach. So does Desiree Davila. So do Kara Goucher, Shalane Flanagan and Dathan Ritzenhein. Almost all of the American runners who went to the London Olympics last summer work with coaches.

     Self-coached age-group runners might wonder why. After all, running is not a team sport where a coach is needed to decide who starts and who comes off the bench, who plays which position, and so forth. Nor is running a highly technical sport like swimming, where coaches are needed to observe and correct form flaws. Indeed, one of the virtues of running as a sport is its simplicity. Within a few years of taking it up any runner can acquire all of the knowledge he requires to coach himself.

If you ask America’s Olympic runners directly why they have coaches, most of them will not cite their lack of knowledge of the sport. These runners know perfectly well how to train. They seek other things from their coaches. Kara Goucher has said that she relies on her coaches to help build her confidence and to take the burden of planning and interpreting her training off her shoulders. Many elite athletes rely on coaches to keep them from doing stupid things, like responding to symptoms of overtraining by training harder.

Another advantage of working with a coach is accountability. This advantage snuck up on me when, in my late thirties, I chose to work with a coach for the first time since high school. My conscious reason for hiring a coach was that I had run out of ideas on how to improve and I wanted someone to give me fresh ideas. That’s another benefit of working with a coach. And, sure enough, my coach had me try some new things with my training that worked well. This was expected. What was unexpected was the sense of heightened accountability that I felt. I never saw myself as an athlete who cut corners, but when I had a coach to report back to I suddenly found myself not cutting corners that I had cut unconsciously before.

 

Check out these eBooks

$16.99
ChiRunning: A Revolutionary Approach to Effortless, Injury-Free Running

Buy now

$10.99
Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind

Buy now

$13.99
Born to Run

Buy now

$9.01
Holistic Fueling For Ironman Triathletes

Buy now

As a coach myself, I may be biased, but I believe that every runner can benefit from working with a good coach. Any one of the above-mentioned benefits—confidence building, stress
alleviation, stupid mistake avoidance, accountability,
and fresh ideas—could make the partnership worthwhile. And the knowledge component should not be underestimated. For lack of knowledge most runners, and even most competitive runners, make fundamental mistakes in their training such as not varying the intensity of their workouts sufficiently.

Once you’ve made the decision to work with a coach you must then find one. The first step in this process is deciding if you’d rather work face to face with a coach in your area of work through the internet and/or by phone with a coach who could be anywhere.

The advantages of working face to face with a local coach are obvious. You certainly won’t do every run with your coach present, but he or she can directly supervise some of your most important workouts. You may also enjoy the opportunity to do track workouts and such with a group of other runners working under the same coach. A coach who sees you run can do things that a remote coach cannot, such as correct your form and observe that you look tired and need a rest.

ca_468x60_giftcertificates
One of the advantages of opening up the map in your coaching search is that you can be very choosy. If you insist on working with a coach who has experience with national champions—well, there may not be such a coach available in
your area.

To summarize, I think you should have a coach. Few runners regret the decision to hire a coach, and it’s a small risk in any case. If it doesn’t work out you can go back to talking yourself out of making stupid mistakes with your training.

 

A New Way to Get a Coach.

      Technology has recently made possible a new type of coach – with the endless possibilities of the internet today, you can sign up for coaching online! For runners, I recommend Ben Greenfield, author of Author of the popular “Beyond Training” book. He is currently the founder and owner of Human Wellness Solutions, a company that develops innovative and cutting-edge fitness and nutrition services and solutions to help people reach their physical and mental performance goals, whether that be to cross the finish line of an Ironman triathlon, or simply shed a few pounds.

Voted in 2008 as the Personal Trainer of the Year by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) and recognized as the top 100 Most Influential People in Health, Ben Greenfield is a fitness, triathlon, and nutrition expert, and has authored multiple books and DVDs

Voted in 2008 as the Personal Trainer of the Year by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) and recognized as the top 100 Most Influential People in Health, Ben Greenfield is a fitness, triathlon, and nutrition expert, and has authored multiple books and DVDs

    From 2006-2009, Ben was Director of Sports Performance and managed the physiology and biomechanics laboratory at Champions Sports Medicine in Spokane, WA, offering metabolic-based weight loss, bicycle fitting, running gait analysis, swim stroke analysis, VO2 max testing, blood lactate testing, resting metabolic rate analysis, and other cutting-edge procedures for weight loss and performance. He is now a full time coach, trainer, nutritionist and author.

     Ben also owns the Rock Star Triathlete Academy, the internet’s top school for learning the sport of triathlon and how to be a better triathlete, the Superhuman Coach Network, a mastermind and mentorship program for personal trainers and health experts, and Endurance Planet, the world’s leading resource for endurance sports entertainment and podcasts. He was voted in 2008 as the Personal Trainer of the Year, by the National Strength and Conditioning Association, an internationally recognized and respected certifying agency.

His credentials include:

-Bachelor’s and master’s degrees from University of Idaho in sports science and exercise physiology

-Personal training and strength and conditioning certifications from the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA)

-Sports nutrition certification from the International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN)

-Advanced bicycle fitting certification from Serotta, the “Harvard” of bicycle fitting schools

-Over 9 years experience in coaching professional, collegiate, and recreational athletes from all sports

 

Download these books by Ben Greenfield:

$1.10
Endurance Training Nutrition: Top 20 Fueling Myths Exposed
Buy now

$7.66
Run With No Pain
Buy now

$10.97
The Low Carbohydrate Diet For Triathletes
Buy now

$9.99
Weight Training for Triathlon: The Ultimate Guide
Buy now

 

The advantage of this online coaching and training course is that you can have access to the products of one of the best athlete and coach there is at any time you want! Ben Greenfield offers lots of advice, lessons, and training plans from the Triathlon Dominator, to  Running pain free, and strength training. Another great advantage of having an Online Coach is that it costs less compared to when you get a personal coach. When you get an Online Coach, you only pay for a one-time investment for the program you choose, whereas having a personal coach requires you to pay him/her for every session!
 

These programs are proven to work and you can see the many testimonials available for each program. The only setback to having an online coach is that YOU have to push yourself and motivate yourself to be dedicated, consistent, and patient with the program.

Remember that this is not some advertisement that you usually see on the internet claiming instant results – it’s a TRAINING COURSE based on proven exercise programs backed up by sports science. The instructions, demo videos, and even one-on-one online coaching are available with a click from your hands. Like any other training regimen, the results are based on how committed you are to training! The guarantee for each program to work depends on how you guarantee your commitment to it and your passion for running.

Don’t get it if you think you won’t be able to follow consistently and be patient with the results. But if you are passionate with your sport and you really want to commit to train to achieve more, then get coached by one of the best triathletes today – it’s worth the investment!

Ben Greenfield offers numerous eBooks and training courses, and if you are the committed athlete who is wiling to invest time and resources in the best training plan there is, the Ironman Dominator Package is for you:

Triathlon Dominator Package
 

 

**********

 

 

TrailHeads Elements Running Gloves (Medium)

Iwotou Protective Gym Running Jogging Sport Armband Case for Samsung Galaxy S4 + Free Accessories (Black)

Asics Unisex CQAR0503 Entry Multi-Color Digital Running Watch

Nathan Sports Trail Hydration Pack with Two 10-Ounce Nutrition Flasks

Original post by Jonathan Ross at Ace fit

==========

If you’re going to do it, you might as well do it right. This applies to just about everything in life, and strength
training is no different. It’s too important—and your time is too valuable—not to do it well.

Consider this quote from Chris Crowley and Dr. Henry Lodge’s terrific book, Younger Next Year: “Cardio training may save your life, but resistan0ce training makes it worth living.” This illustrates the essential quality that strength training possesses. Cardio makes your lungs, heart, and blood more capable while strength training improves the bones, muscles and joints—making you feel better while you are moving and doing things.
 

Here are four common strength-training mistakes and some tips for turning these mistakes into successes.
1. Switching Programs Too Often (Often Called “Program Hopping”)

Optimum Nutrition
BCAA 1000 Caps
1000 mg – 200 Capsules

Buy now

There are a many effective workout programs. There also are many great subjects you can study in college. What’s the connection? In college, you sign up for a class and then you attend it several times a week—for an entire semester. Obvious, right? Of course, this is the best way to gain sufficient knowledge and mastery of a subject for it to be at all useful.

Imagine a college that would let you change your classes every other week. You’d spend a no more than two to three weeks in each class and then change to new classes. Just as you’re getting to the point where you’re starting to actually learn something and get a little better at it, change happens and it’s gone. This is ridiculous! And yet, this is exactly what most people do with their workout programs.

No one gets out of shape overnight. It’s actually a relatively lengthy process of consistently repeating a combination of behaviors that result in physical transformation given enough time. And the exact same thing applies to what it takes to get in shape.

Yet somehow with strength training, the simple truth of what it takes to see progress is often abandoned in favor of jumping to a new program after a few weeks, because a radical transformation hasn’t happened.
 

FIX THE MISTAKE: Once you begin an effective program, get into it, do the work, and make sure to keep it steadily progressive so things get a little more challenging as your body begins to adapt. The rest of this article contains some great tips for doing just that, but no program will be effective if you don’t stick with it long enough to see results. How long is long enough? I recommend a minimum of four weeks, with a maximum of 10 to 12 weeks before changing programs.
2. Lifting…Without Shifting or Twisting
Most weightlifting exercises involve lifting, directly opposing gravity by moving resistance vertically up and down (e.g., squat, dead lift, shoulder press, pull-up). But in life, we lift, shift and twist things we hold, even if it’s just ourselves. We move through gravity, which means we have to deal with momentum. We live and move in three planes of movement, so a strength-training program in three planes of movement is essential.

FIX THE MISTAKE: We’ve done a great job of spreading the message that resistance training (“lifting”) is essential for fitness. Now we need to expand the definition of lifting to include shifting and twisting. The exercise options here are nearly limitless. Click here to view three great examples of these exercises from a full article I wrote on this topic.
 

3. Never Changing Your Speed

$8.99
Pure Protein Chocolate
Deluxe Value Pack
6 count

Buy now

Strength training is great for developing muscle and aesthetics, but it’s equally important to do it for life in general. Life comes at you at different speeds. Sometimes life makes you move fast, like when you almost drop your cell phone. Sometimes life makes you move fast and unpredictably, like when someone bumps into you while walking down the street.

And yet with strength training, it is usually performed at a slow, controlled tempo out of concern for safety. Somehow, adding speed is automatically considered dangerous. Speed without skill is dangerous. But speed that is added to skill is the essence of moving in life and in sport. If all of your strength training is slow and controlled, then you’re not really getting ready for everything life can throw at you.

To be clear on terms, truthfully “strength” training is done for a low number of reps with high resistance (see next mistake, below). In common use, “strength training” and “resistance training” are used interchangeably, although the former is really a type of the latter. When you add speed, you’re training more for power or reactivity than strictly strength. But the ability to apply some strength quickly is what gets you out of most of life’s potential physical challenges.

FIX THE MISTAKE: Try moving a little faster while weight training—and perhaps even a little slower—than you are used to. The more range of speeds you train for, the more ability your body develops. Add enough speed that it challenges you in new ways, but not so much that it makes your movements too sloppy.

4. Lifting Too Little
A prominent “celebrity trainer” insists that women should never lift more than 3 pounds. Essentially, she’s telling every mother and grandmother to never pick up or hold her children or grandchildren. She didn’t say that specifically, but children obviously weigh more than 3 pounds. Where is the backlash? Unfortunately, there hasn’t been any because, when it comes to women and strength training, many still believe that any weight is too heavy. Despite the fact that countless articles and experts seek to dispel this myth, it continues to dominate the thinking of many people and, unfortunately, even some trainers. To get the benefits of strength training (or any other form of exercise), you must provide a stimulus beyond which the body is currently adapted.

The common fear that lifting heavier weights will make you too bulky is, like most fears, unfounded and irrational. It is exceedingly difficult to grow very large muscles, and even more so for women due to hormone differences between the genders.

Lifting heaver does not mean going from 10 pounds to 200 pounds, so concerns about safety are grossly overstated and unfounded. By steadily increasing demand, real gains in strength, muscle definition and physical ability are guaranteed.

WHEY PROTEIN POWDER
MUTANT WHEY 5LBS CHOCOLATE!
LOW CAL, LEAN GAINER
PLUS FREE DELUXE SHAKER!

Buy now

FIX THE MISTAKE: Once you’ve been using a comfortably challenging weight for a while, try to beat your rep goal and don’t stop until you feel fatigued on the movement. Once you can do two or more reps than your target, you can be assured that it’s safe to increase the amount of resistance. If you’re concerned about going up too much, just progress to the next smallest increment. I’ll tell you a secret: Sometimes to drive this point home with a client, I will talk to them about something distracting while they are performing an exercise so they lose count and I have them keep going until they feel fatigue. I’m keeping track of the reps and when they are done I tell them how many they did. Many people are shocked when they double their target reps with a given weight!
 

Wrap-up

Making real progress with strength training is not easy, but it isn’t the hardest thing in the world either. It’s much more challenging to life a live of decreasing strength, ability and vitality. All you need is the right mix of consistency and intensity. Yes, it’s a little tough. But you are worth the effort. If the human body can do it, it’s best to train for it. So lift heavier weights more slowly, lift lighter weights more quickly, and mix in some shifting and twisting along with your lifting, and you’ll be well on your way to strength-training success.

========================================================================
This post is originally from “Ace Fit.”

100 Pounds Of Muscle Strength Training Type (Blue 50 Pounds)
Buy now
Grizzly Fitness 8751-04-X-Large Power Paw Strength Training Gloves
Buy now

Household Elastic Rope Pull Rope Strength Training
Buy now
ZoN EX/SBAL-10-X 10 Lb Strength Training Ball (Black/Silver)
Buy now

$12.09
Natrol Biotin Maximum Strength 100 Tablets
Buy now

$42.79
Joint MAX Double Strength (120 SOFT CHEWS)
Buy now

$44.44
Webber Naturals® Triple Strength Omega-3 Enteric Coated 900 mg 150softgels (one per day)
Buy now

eBook $9.99
Starting Strength eBook
Buy now

Optimum mass

It may be an unfamiliar and unheard-of-term, but common injuries like Patella-femoral Pain syndrome, Illiotibial Band syndrome, Low back pains, and Piriformis syndromes may all be caused by this less known condition: Gluteal Amnesia. This occurs when your body ‘forgets’ how to properly engage the Gluteal muscles – the biggest and strongest muscle group of our bodies. Even the most elite athlete can experience this if their glutes aren’t trained to fire properly, or the muscle group is neglected and weak.

Right hip. Side view.

Right hip. Side view.

Our daily activities today doesn’t really encourage proper gluteal activation: If you’ve been sitting for long periods at work or at school, your gluteal muscles are probably ‘trained’ to be apathetic. Sitting (at work, driving, watching tv, computer, etc) tightens the hip flexors, and that tightness restrains the glutes. Standing for long periods of time also diminishes gluteal activation by compensating with the quadriceps and hamstrings for stability.

The anterior leg muscles and hip flexors, which antagonizes the gluteals.

(Front view) The anterior leg muscles and hip flexors, which antagonizes the gluteals.

The Gluteal Muscles – maximus, medius, and minimus – is the powerhouse that generates propulsion (ie, pushes your body forward when walking, running, jumping forward) and is a major key in helping prevent common injuries.

Here are some tips to make sure you keep your powerhouse working:

    posterior chain*If you sit for long hours every day, let your hip flexors breathe. Stand up – and even walk around, if you can – once in a while (at least every hour or less) to stretch and mobilize those tight muscles.
    *When you’re standing for long periods of time, make sure that you achieve a ‘neutral pelvis‘ and engage your core muscles. Remember the draw-in maneuver: tuck your tail bone in and draw your belly button to your spine. Squeeze your buttocks together and don’t let your quads and hams do all the work.
    *Proper posture plays a big role in gluteal activation. Your spine is connected to your hips which is where your glutes originate. Keep your hips square (neutral pelvis) then lengthen your spine from the hips, keeping your trunk erect whether you’re sitting or standing. Slouching affects your lowback and hip placement, which then keeps your gluteals from firing properly. Also when sitting, make sure your knees are aligned with your hips (ie, your computer chair or car seat should not be too high or too low).
    *Regularly stretch your quadriceps, hip flexors, and low back. Take the time to loosen up those muscles when you feel like you’ve been sitting or standing for too long.
    When you’re working out doing lunges and squats, make sure you really drop your hips and bring your thighs parallel to the floor (keep your knees above your ankles, trunk erect). This position will really force your powerhouse to work!

Squat_Depth.x.a

For any activity that you’ll do, don’t let your thighs and lowback do the work. Compensation by the quadriceps and hamstrings inhibits gluteal activation. You’ll also lessen the stress from your lowback if you fire up your glutes.

Maximize your Gluteus Maximus!