Posts Tagged ‘Sports Science’

sports_468x60

If you are an office worker who is dedicated to running but your low back pain from long hours of sitting keeps you from achieving more, then read ahead!

How do you run with pain?

You don’t have to!

The sacroiliac joints – the bones that connect the lowest tip of your spine (sacrum) to your hip bones (iliac) – are considered a source of most lower back pain when your hip becomes compressed, or if there is asymmetry or misalignment of the hips which leads to joint dysfunction and subsequent pain. Compression of the pelvis occurs when seated for a long time, and rotation of the hips occurs in both cycling and running, and combining these two factors can be the cause of low back pain. An especially significant correlation can be seen between low back pain and lack of internal hip rotation mobility.

The development of asymmetry in the hips and improper muscle lengths in the hip rotator muscles can be caused by frequently assumed postures, like sitting for long periods or time or being bent over on a bicycle for hours in the saddle.

This was important to know, and a key to the secret of eliminating the low back pain.

The book “Run With No Pain” is the official, easy and practical step-by-step exercise routine for eliminating low back pain in athletes and includes over 30 exercise videos that teach you exactly how to implement each section of the program.

If you’ve been going to Physiotherapist or a Chiropractor for your pain, then this eBook is definitely much cheaper!

Download it from amazon to your kindle or iPad for only $7.66!

strength training

Advertisements

SHOP

If you’re training for a Triathlon, Marathon, or any endurance event for that matter, what should you eat to fuel your training?
 

 

Your diet can make or break your goals. The Low Carbohydrate Diet For Triathletes by Ben Greenfield shows the committed Triathlete which are the best low-carbohydrate food to eat. Remember that what you eat while you train is just as important as how you’re training. Training for a triathlon will push your body to the max, so you have to make sure that your body gets enough energy to sustain your training until race day while maintaining your target weight.

Ben Greenfield summed it up this way:

In a nutshell, pun intended, as you begin to increase carbohydrate consumption above the levels that you need for survival or periods of intense physical activity, you lose your ability to rely on fat burning mechanisms, and you experience the damaging effects of chronically elevated blood sugars, including neuropathy (nerve damage), nephropathy (kidney damage), retinnopathy (eye damage), increased cardiovascular disease risk, potential for cancer progression (tumor cells feed on sugar) and bacterial or fungal infection.

So if the dangers of a low carb diet that I talked about didn’t deter you, and you’re bent on banning bread, take heart. There is a way to do a The Low Carbohydrate Diet For Triathletes
low carbohydrate diet the right way. Here are 10 ways to eat a low carbohydrate diet while avoiding common mistakes.

100 Ways To
Boost Your Metabolism

Buy now

1. Time Carbohydrates Wisely.

This one is a biggie, so we’ll start with it. One of the main reasons for eating a low carbohydrate diet is because your blood sugar levels stay far more stabilized. But there is a time that you can consume carbohydrate without causing your blood sugar levels to go on a roller coaster ride – and that time is immediately before, during, or after exercise.

So if you are on a low carbohydrate diet, I highly recommend carbohydrate intake for exercise sessions that are 1) intense; 2) involve weight training; 3) are longer than 2 hours in duration.

Although many folks use this as an excuse to eat more carbs than they should there is certainly truth to the fact that “fat burns in the flame of carbohydrate” – meaning if you are constantly carb depleted due to zero calories of glucose intake, you can shut down your body’s natural fat burning capabilities. So if you’re planning on exercising, try get at least 500-600 calories of carbohydrate per day, and eat them before, during or after your exercise session if you want them to not affect your blood sugars levels in a potentially damaging way.

2. Take Into Consideration Your Body Fat Levels.

If you’re fat, you’re going to have more fat to burn. Look down at your waistline. Do you have layers of fat that you can grab? A beer belly? Muffin-tops? All of that is fat that can be mobilized if you are on a low carbohydrate diet. But if your body fat is under 7-8% as a male, or in the low teens as a female, then it is highly likely that you’re going to struggle with a consistently low carbohydrate intake – specifically during exercise sessions.

So if I have a client who is 30% body fat, I have no issues with that client staring at the ceiling awake at night craving carbohydrates as their body mobilizes fat tissue for energy, and I generally continue to advise them to watch their carb intake. But if that person is 6% body fat, it is far more likely that they’re going to need that extra fat for insulation or essential fat stores, in which case it might be a good idea to go slam a bowl of rice.

SHOP3. Don’t Eat Processed Crap.

I mentioned this in my last article that typical “low carbohydrate” meal replacement bars and shakes, ice creams or ice cream sandwiches, and other low carb or sugar-free snacks often contain potentially unhealthy ingredients like maltitol, and are chock full of preservatives and highly processed ingredients. If your low carbohydrate diet involves boxed, wrapped and packaged food, it probably falls into this category.

Get this through your head – whether a food is low carbohydrate or not, if it is something you see advertised on TV, magazines, or newspapers you probably shouldn’t eat it. If it’s something you can easily recognize and identify where it grew and how it go to your plate, it probably is OK to eat.

This means that avocados are cool. Guacamole from your grocery store that has (and this is a popular brand):

Skim Milk, Soybean Oil, Tomatoes, Water, Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil (Coconut Oil, Safflower and/or Corn Oil), Eggs, Distilled Vinegar, Avocado Pulp, Onions, Salt, Nonfat Dry Milk, Egg Yolks, Lactic Acid, Sugar, Whey, Sodium Caseinate, Mono and Diglycerides, Gelatin, Soy Protein Isolate, Xanthan Gum, Corn Starch, Guar Gum, Mustard Flour, Black Pepper, Red Chili Pepper, Potassium Sorbate and Sodium Benzoate (Added to Retard Spoilage), Coriander, Lemon Juice Concentrate, Cellulose Gel, Cellulose Gum, Locust Bean Gum, Disodium Phosphate, Cilantro, Gum Arabic, Extractives of Garlic and Black Pepper, Paprika Oil, Oregano, Thyme, Bay Leaf, Calcium Chloride, Citric Acid, Dextrose, Artificial Color (FD&C Blue No. 1, FD&C Red No. 40, FD&C Yellow No. 5, FD&C Yellow No. 6).

is not cool. This is just one example, but I think it gives you a pretty good idea of what I’m getting at. Eat real food – not processed crap.

4. Inject Carbohydrate Loading Days.

This is another biggie. Long term carbohydrate deprivation leads to a complete depletion of your body’s storage glycogen levels, depression of your immune system, decrease in metabolic function, and a host of other issues that you may be able to put up with if you’re content to lie around on the couch, but that you’re guaranteed to get completely destroyed by if you’re planning on regular physical activity or competition like Crossfit, triathlon or marathon.

LowCarbDietTriath2502

Fortunately, there’s an easy fix, and this is a big part of my new book “Low Carbohydrate Guide For Triathletes”: simply inject strategic carbohydrate re-feeding days into your exercise routine, either the day before your biggest workout day of the week or the day of your biggest workout of your week. On this day, you double or triple your normal carbohydrate intake, and eat at or slightly above your total calorie needs.

The disadvantage of doing this the day before your biggest workout of the week is that you’re often resting on that day, and being sedentary while eating a ton of carbohydrates is not that great for your blood sugar levels. The disadvantage of doing it the day of your biggest workout of the week is that sometimes you’re too busy exercising to eat much, but this is only really an issue for someone like an Ironman triathlete.

5. Use Supplements Wisely.

When you begin a low carbohydrate diet, you’re guaranteed to experience intense carbohydrate cravings. There are supplements that can help curb cravings, including chromium and vanadium (such as in Thermofactor), gymnema sylvestre (but you gotta take about 4000+ mg per day of it, which means you’d really want a physician’s brand version), L-tryptophan or amino acids (if the issue is a serotonin deficiency) and even foods like those I demonstrate in my video: 5 Ways To Suppress Your Appetite Without Taking Pills or Capsules.

For exercise sessions, I actually recently tried out wasp larvae extract (VESPA), which is supposedly able to increase your ability to utilize free fatty acids as a fuel during exercise. I took two packets of it, and was able to go about 4 hours on 1 gel. The disadvantage was that I was never able to go “above threshold”, or into my carbohydrate burning heart rate zone, so I’m not convinced I’d use it in a race, but it could certainly come in handy if you’re trying to get by on a low carbohydrate diet and also do long exercise sessions.

TrailHeads Elements Running Gloves (Medium)

Iwotou Protective Gym Running Jogging Sport Armband Case for Samsung Galaxy S4 + Free Accessories (Black)

Asics Unisex CQAR0503 Entry Multi-Color Digital Running Watch

Nathan Sports Trail Hydration Pack with Two 10-Ounce Nutrition Flasks

6. Be In It For The Long Haul.

When you first start a low carbohydrate diet, your weight will plummet as your body sheds storage glycogen and all the water that the storage carbohydrate sucks up like a sponge. So if your goal is weight loss, life is good for the first couple weeks as you shed anywhere from 3-20 pounds, depending on your starting weight.

And then the weight loss stops. In most cases, this is the point where people throw up their hands in despair, convinced that the plan isn’t working, quit the low carbohydrate diet, and go in search of a pastry shop.

But if you stick with a low carbohydrate diet, the weight loss will gradually and consistently continue, especially if you include strategically implemented days where you allow your body’s storage carbohydrate levels to be re-filled.

7. Be Ready For Discomfort

During the first 7-14 days that you go low carb, you’re going to find that your energy levels plummet, you get grumpy, you feel lethargic, and your body simply does not move or perform the way you’d like it to. This is because you are burning fatty acids (ketones) as a fuel.

So a strict low carbohydrate diet can be uncomfortable, and you need to be mentally prepared for that. Implementing the carbohydrate craving tips I gave earlier will help, but ultimately, you will find that you feel the same way as a marathoner does when they “bonk”, which is what happens during a run when your body runs out of storage carbohydrate and needs to begin burning fat as a fuel. This is also called “hitting the wall”.

If the discomfort does not subside, then I recommend you A) identify nutritional deficiencies and get tested for fatty acids and also for amino acids, and also make sure you’re incorporating carbohydrate re-feed days if you’re an physically active person.

Triathlon Time Trial
Mountain Bike Bicycle
Rest Relaxation Handlebar
Buy now

8. Stay Hydrated.

Not only will adequate water help to reduce the carbohydrate cravings you may experience early in the diet, but A) water is also essential for beta-oxidation, which is how your body burns fat as a fuel and B) you’re going to lose a significant amount of storage water as your body sheds carbohydrate stores, so you’ll need more as a dietary source.

I personally drink and recommend ample amounts of soda water, unsweetened Kombucha, water with effervescent electrolytes dissolved in it, water with deltaE and just plain water. What I don’t drink is anything with added artificial sweeteners or sugars. So check your nutrition labels if you’re drinking fluid from packages or bottles, but stay hydrated when you’re on a diet like this.

9. Get Your Fiber.

When you switch to a low carbohydrate diet, the drop in fruit, vegetables, legume and grain consumption can significantly decrease fiber intake and result in inadequate phytonutrient, antioxidant, vitamin C and potassium intake. There is absolutely no reason that you can’t eat liberal amounts of dark leafy greens and other non-starchy vegetables on a low-carbohydrate diet. Just be careful with your total daily intake and timing of starchy vegetables or tubers, such as beets, sweet potatoes or taro.

10. Don’t Judge.

This may seem a bit preachy, but I feel compelled to point out the fact that there are a multitude of successful vegan or vegeterian endurance athletes, including ultra-runner Scott Jureky, pro triathlete and ultra-runner Brendan Brazier, pro triathlete Hilary Biscay, US Master’s Running Champion Tim Van Orden, and top ultraman finisher Rich Roll.

Since most vegan and vegetarian diets are definitely not low carbohydrate, this demonstrates that you can succeed without eating a low carbohydrate diet. However, the low carbohydrate or ketogenic approach can be especially successful for fat loss, for learning to burn fats more efficiently and even for reducing risk of, or managing, chronic diseases such as diabetes or cancer.

 

Download THE LOW CARBOHYDRATE DIET FOR TRIATHLETES and other eBooks by Ben Greenfield:

$1.10
Endurance Training Nutrition: Top 20 Fueling Myths Exposed
Buy now

$7.66
Run With No Pain
Buy now

$10.97
The Low Carbohydrate Diet For Triathletes
Buy now

$9.99
Weight Training for Triathlon: The Ultimate Guide
Buy now

SHOP

SHOP

 

Watch this video by Ben Greenfields about Endurance training, HIIT, and the Pareto Principle:

I recommend Ben Greenfield, author of Author of the popular “Beyond Training” book. He is currently the founder and owner of Human Wellness Solutions, a company that develops innovative and cutting-edge fitness and nutrition services and solutions to help people reach their physical and mental performance goals, whether that be to cross the finish line of an Ironman triathlon, or simply shed a few pounds.

Voted in 2008 as the Personal Trainer of the Year by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) and recognized as the top 100 Most Influential People in Health, Ben Greenfield is a fitness, triathlon, and nutrition expert, and has authored multiple books and DVDs

Voted in 2008 as the Personal Trainer of the Year by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) and recognized as the top 100 Most Influential People in Health, Ben Greenfield is a fitness, triathlon, and nutrition expert, and has authored multiple books and DVDs

    From 2006-2009, Ben was Director of Sports Performance and managed the physiology and biomechanics laboratory at Champions Sports Medicine in Spokane, WA, offering metabolic-based weight loss, bicycle fitting, running gait analysis, swim stroke analysis, VO2 max testing, blood lactate testing, resting metabolic rate analysis, and other cutting-edge procedures for weight loss and performance. He is now a full time coach, trainer, nutritionist and author.

     Ben also owns the Rock Star Triathlete Academy, the internet’s top school for learning the sport of triathlon and how to be a better triathlete, the Superhuman Coach Network, a mastermind and mentorship program for personal trainers and health experts, and Endurance Planet, the world’s leading resource for endurance sports entertainment and podcasts. He was voted in 2008 as the Personal Trainer of the Year, by the National Strength and Conditioning Association, an internationally recognized and respected certifying agency.

His credentials include:

-Bachelor’s and master’s degrees from University of Idaho in sports science and exercise physiology

-Personal training and strength and conditioning certifications from the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA)

-Sports nutrition certification from the International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN)

-Advanced bicycle fitting certification from Serotta, the “Harvard” of bicycle fitting schools

-Over 9 years experience in coaching professional, collegiate, and recreational athletes from all sports

 

Download these books by Ben Greenfield:

$1.10
Endurance Training Nutrition: Top 20 Fueling Myths Exposed
Buy now

$7.66
Run With No Pain
Buy now

$10.97
The Low Carbohydrate Diet For Triathletes
Buy now

$9.99
Weight Training for Triathlon: The Ultimate Guide
Buy now

SHOP

Watch Ben Greenfield answer that question:

 

$16.99
Running Motivation Raptor Shirt Funny Dinosaur Tee to Motivate Runners L
 

Buy now

from $404.00 and up
Garmin Forerunner 305 Waterproof Running GPS with Heart Rate Monitor
 

Buy now

$32.99
Pyle-Sport PHRM38GR Heart Rate Monitor Watch with Minimum Average Heart Rate Calories Target Zones, Green
 

Buy now

$15.99
48 Inch Speed Training Parachute Running Chute – Blue
 

Buy now

 

I recommend Ben Greenfield, author of Author of the popular “Beyond Training” book. He is currently the founder and owner of Human Wellness Solutions, a company that develops innovative and cutting-edge fitness and nutrition services and solutions to help people reach their physical and mental performance goals, whether that be to cross the finish line of an Ironman triathlon, or simply shed a few pounds.

Voted in 2008 as the Personal Trainer of the Year by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) and recognized as the top 100 Most Influential People in Health, Ben Greenfield is a fitness, triathlon, and nutrition expert, and has authored multiple books and DVDs

Voted in 2008 as the Personal Trainer of the Year by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) and recognized as the top 100 Most Influential People in Health, Ben Greenfield is a fitness, triathlon, and nutrition expert, and has authored multiple books and DVDs

    From 2006-2009, Ben was Director of Sports Performance and managed the physiology and biomechanics laboratory at Champions Sports Medicine in Spokane, WA, offering metabolic-based weight loss, bicycle fitting, running gait analysis, swim stroke analysis, VO2 max testing, blood lactate testing, resting metabolic rate analysis, and other cutting-edge procedures for weight loss and performance. He is now a full time coach, trainer, nutritionist and author.

     Ben also owns the Rock Star Triathlete Academy, the internet’s top school for learning the sport of triathlon and how to be a better triathlete, the Superhuman Coach Network, a mastermind and mentorship program for personal trainers and health experts, and Endurance Planet, the world’s leading resource for endurance sports entertainment and podcasts. He was voted in 2008 as the Personal Trainer of the Year, by the National Strength and Conditioning Association, an internationally recognized and respected certifying agency.

 

His credentials include:

-Bachelor’s and master’s degrees from University of Idaho in sports science and exercise physiology

-Personal training and strength and conditioning certifications from the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA)

-Sports nutrition certification from the International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN)

-Advanced bicycle fitting certification from Serotta, the “Harvard” of bicycle fitting schools

-Over 9 years experience in coaching professional, collegiate, and recreational athletes from all sports

 

 

 

$10.97
The Low Carbohydrate Diet For Triathletes

Buy now

$9.01
Holistic Fueling For Ironman Triathletes

Buy now

ca_468x60_giftcertificates
This post is adapted from Matt Fitzgerald‘s article. He’s the author of RUN: The Mind-Body Method of Running by Feel (VeloPress, 2010) and an expert training content developer for PEAR Sports. Learn more at mattfitzgerald.org
=============================================================================

Garmin Forerunner 10 GPS Watch (Pink/White)

Buy now

Garmin Forerunner 210 Water Resistant GPS Enabled Watch without Heart Rate Monitor

Buy now

Garmin Forerunner 310XT Waterproof Running GPS With USB ANT Stick and Heart Rate Monitor

Buy now

Garmin Forerunner 10 GPS Watch (Black/Red)

Buy now

There’s a reason Olympic runners have coaches—the same reason you may need one.

   Meb Kelfezighi has a coach. So does Desiree Davila. So do Kara Goucher, Shalane Flanagan and Dathan Ritzenhein. Almost all of the American runners who went to the London Olympics last summer work with coaches.

     Self-coached age-group runners might wonder why. After all, running is not a team sport where a coach is needed to decide who starts and who comes off the bench, who plays which position, and so forth. Nor is running a highly technical sport like swimming, where coaches are needed to observe and correct form flaws. Indeed, one of the virtues of running as a sport is its simplicity. Within a few years of taking it up any runner can acquire all of the knowledge he requires to coach himself.

If you ask America’s Olympic runners directly why they have coaches, most of them will not cite their lack of knowledge of the sport. These runners know perfectly well how to train. They seek other things from their coaches. Kara Goucher has said that she relies on her coaches to help build her confidence and to take the burden of planning and interpreting her training off her shoulders. Many elite athletes rely on coaches to keep them from doing stupid things, like responding to symptoms of overtraining by training harder.

Another advantage of working with a coach is accountability. This advantage snuck up on me when, in my late thirties, I chose to work with a coach for the first time since high school. My conscious reason for hiring a coach was that I had run out of ideas on how to improve and I wanted someone to give me fresh ideas. That’s another benefit of working with a coach. And, sure enough, my coach had me try some new things with my training that worked well. This was expected. What was unexpected was the sense of heightened accountability that I felt. I never saw myself as an athlete who cut corners, but when I had a coach to report back to I suddenly found myself not cutting corners that I had cut unconsciously before.

 

Check out these eBooks

$16.99
ChiRunning: A Revolutionary Approach to Effortless, Injury-Free Running

Buy now

$10.99
Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind

Buy now

$13.99
Born to Run

Buy now

$9.01
Holistic Fueling For Ironman Triathletes

Buy now

As a coach myself, I may be biased, but I believe that every runner can benefit from working with a good coach. Any one of the above-mentioned benefits—confidence building, stress
alleviation, stupid mistake avoidance, accountability,
and fresh ideas—could make the partnership worthwhile. And the knowledge component should not be underestimated. For lack of knowledge most runners, and even most competitive runners, make fundamental mistakes in their training such as not varying the intensity of their workouts sufficiently.

Once you’ve made the decision to work with a coach you must then find one. The first step in this process is deciding if you’d rather work face to face with a coach in your area of work through the internet and/or by phone with a coach who could be anywhere.

The advantages of working face to face with a local coach are obvious. You certainly won’t do every run with your coach present, but he or she can directly supervise some of your most important workouts. You may also enjoy the opportunity to do track workouts and such with a group of other runners working under the same coach. A coach who sees you run can do things that a remote coach cannot, such as correct your form and observe that you look tired and need a rest.

ca_468x60_giftcertificates
One of the advantages of opening up the map in your coaching search is that you can be very choosy. If you insist on working with a coach who has experience with national champions—well, there may not be such a coach available in
your area.

To summarize, I think you should have a coach. Few runners regret the decision to hire a coach, and it’s a small risk in any case. If it doesn’t work out you can go back to talking yourself out of making stupid mistakes with your training.

 

A New Way to Get a Coach.

      Technology has recently made possible a new type of coach – with the endless possibilities of the internet today, you can sign up for coaching online! For runners, I recommend Ben Greenfield, author of Author of the popular “Beyond Training” book. He is currently the founder and owner of Human Wellness Solutions, a company that develops innovative and cutting-edge fitness and nutrition services and solutions to help people reach their physical and mental performance goals, whether that be to cross the finish line of an Ironman triathlon, or simply shed a few pounds.

Voted in 2008 as the Personal Trainer of the Year by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) and recognized as the top 100 Most Influential People in Health, Ben Greenfield is a fitness, triathlon, and nutrition expert, and has authored multiple books and DVDs

Voted in 2008 as the Personal Trainer of the Year by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) and recognized as the top 100 Most Influential People in Health, Ben Greenfield is a fitness, triathlon, and nutrition expert, and has authored multiple books and DVDs

    From 2006-2009, Ben was Director of Sports Performance and managed the physiology and biomechanics laboratory at Champions Sports Medicine in Spokane, WA, offering metabolic-based weight loss, bicycle fitting, running gait analysis, swim stroke analysis, VO2 max testing, blood lactate testing, resting metabolic rate analysis, and other cutting-edge procedures for weight loss and performance. He is now a full time coach, trainer, nutritionist and author.

     Ben also owns the Rock Star Triathlete Academy, the internet’s top school for learning the sport of triathlon and how to be a better triathlete, the Superhuman Coach Network, a mastermind and mentorship program for personal trainers and health experts, and Endurance Planet, the world’s leading resource for endurance sports entertainment and podcasts. He was voted in 2008 as the Personal Trainer of the Year, by the National Strength and Conditioning Association, an internationally recognized and respected certifying agency.

His credentials include:

-Bachelor’s and master’s degrees from University of Idaho in sports science and exercise physiology

-Personal training and strength and conditioning certifications from the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA)

-Sports nutrition certification from the International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN)

-Advanced bicycle fitting certification from Serotta, the “Harvard” of bicycle fitting schools

-Over 9 years experience in coaching professional, collegiate, and recreational athletes from all sports

 

Download these books by Ben Greenfield:

$1.10
Endurance Training Nutrition: Top 20 Fueling Myths Exposed
Buy now

$7.66
Run With No Pain
Buy now

$10.97
The Low Carbohydrate Diet For Triathletes
Buy now

$9.99
Weight Training for Triathlon: The Ultimate Guide
Buy now

 

The advantage of this online coaching and training course is that you can have access to the products of one of the best athlete and coach there is at any time you want! Ben Greenfield offers lots of advice, lessons, and training plans from the Triathlon Dominator, to  Running pain free, and strength training. Another great advantage of having an Online Coach is that it costs less compared to when you get a personal coach. When you get an Online Coach, you only pay for a one-time investment for the program you choose, whereas having a personal coach requires you to pay him/her for every session!
 

These programs are proven to work and you can see the many testimonials available for each program. The only setback to having an online coach is that YOU have to push yourself and motivate yourself to be dedicated, consistent, and patient with the program.

Remember that this is not some advertisement that you usually see on the internet claiming instant results – it’s a TRAINING COURSE based on proven exercise programs backed up by sports science. The instructions, demo videos, and even one-on-one online coaching are available with a click from your hands. Like any other training regimen, the results are based on how committed you are to training! The guarantee for each program to work depends on how you guarantee your commitment to it and your passion for running.

Don’t get it if you think you won’t be able to follow consistently and be patient with the results. But if you are passionate with your sport and you really want to commit to train to achieve more, then get coached by one of the best triathletes today – it’s worth the investment!

Ben Greenfield offers numerous eBooks and training courses, and if you are the committed athlete who is wiling to invest time and resources in the best training plan there is, the Ironman Dominator Package is for you:

Triathlon Dominator Package
 

 

**********

 

 

TrailHeads Elements Running Gloves (Medium)

Iwotou Protective Gym Running Jogging Sport Armband Case for Samsung Galaxy S4 + Free Accessories (Black)

Asics Unisex CQAR0503 Entry Multi-Color Digital Running Watch

Nathan Sports Trail Hydration Pack with Two 10-Ounce Nutrition Flasks


 

Hans Selye (1976) a Canadian physician, stated that exercise (like resistance training, etc) can be considered as a good form of stress called ‘eustress.’ This good stress allows the human movement system to adapt over time and maintain equilibrium in the body under a variety of conditions.

This is the essence of training progression: the body must experience some form of a stressor that causes the body to respond by adapting to that stress.

Selye indicated that there are three stages of response to stress:

    1. Alarm Reaction
    2. Resistance Development
    3. Exhaustion

Alarm Reaction

The Alarm Reaction Stage is when the body allows different physiological and psychological responses to stress, with the purpose of protecting the body. During the first sessions of a resistance training program, the body tries to adapt to the weight load on the bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles. Blood flow and oxygen supply is redirected to the working muscles, and the nerves recruit more muscle fibers to work.

Before beginning resistance training, the body may be inefficient at responding to the load carried during exercise. By applying the Principle of Progressive Overload, the body gradually increases its ability to exert the necessary responses to the stress placed on it. A good way to observe this stage is through the DOMS (Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness) – the muscles, ligaments, and tendons are still trying to ‘fix’ itself according to respond properly to the work placed upon it.

theraband

Resistance Development

During the Resistance Development Stage, the body starts to increase its capability to respond to eustress. Muscle fibers are properly recruited, and blood flow and oxygen supply to the working muscles are efficient. When adaptation has occured, the body then will need a higher amount of stress or overload to produce a higher response and a higher level of fitness.

For resistance training, there are many ways to increase the stress on the body. Most Gym trainers only add weight to the usual amount that a client carries which would result to exhaustion or plateuing. The repetitions, sets, intensity, length of rest periods, type of exercise, etc can be altered to produce the desired progressive overload.

On this phase, the same amount of work load would not result to DOMS and there will be less soreness which would allow the client to increase performance.

Exhaustion

If the stress placed on the body is not carefully programmed (sudden overload, overuse, inadequate rest period, etc) training could result to the Exhaustion Stage or distress. This would lead to injuries such as fractures, strains, acute or chronic pains, and even emotional fatigue.

Periodization is important to avoid this stage in exercise training. Any kind of training, whether resistance, endurance, power, etc should be cycled through different stages that provides the necessary loads for sufficient adaptation while allowing enough rest and recuperation for the body. If a training program is not periodized, Overtraining syndrome would occur especially when the body is subjected to continuously increasing amounts of stress without enough rest and recovery. Overtraining is shown by decreased performance, fatigue, loss of appetite, decreased immunity, hormonal disorders, disrupted sleeping patterns, and even mood disturbances.

Simply put, too much of the good thing (eustress) can be detrimental.

Periodization of training allows the specific adaptations in the body to happen while progressively increasing the load by dividing the training program into small cycles that allows for enough rest and recovery to the working muscles. This also helps the client/athlete reach his/her desired goals to improve performance. For the athlete, a periodized program would have a well-planned schedule that coincides with the athlete’s next competition. For the regular client who just wants to stay fit, his/her periodized program would be composed of different cycles throughout the year (or through the time spent with the trainer/coach) that varies the types of exercises, reps, sets, and rest periods to accommodate the desired goal without overtraining the body.

*Note (12/05/2013): I will write more on Periodization as soon as I’m done packing and flying next week. 🙂

Being fit is not only about being able to meet the demands of your daily activities (work, school, etc) well, but about having that extra energy for other recreational pursuits, unplanned activities, and/or emergencies without getting too tired. These two definitions that I found are what I think the most accurate and complete.

The first definition by Clarke (1976) is the one which was used by most Physical Education subjects:

The ability to carry out daily tasks (work and play) with vigour and alertness, without undue fatigue and with ample energy to enjoy leisure-time pursuits and to meet unforeseen emergencies.

Hoeger (2006) rephrased the definition while keeping it specific and complete:

The ability to meet the ordinary as well as the unusual demands of daily life safely and effectively without being overly fatigued and still have energy left for leisure and recreational activities.

Cardio-vascular Endurance, Muscular Endurance, and Speed are the main components in Running.

Cardio-vascular Endurance, Muscular Endurance, and Speed are the main components in Running.

Fitness has various aspects which should be fully understood by coaches and trainers for a more elaborate and complete training program that would help the athlete/client reach his/her goals effectively. It is subdivided into two kinds of components that helps define it more specifically: Health-related components and Skill-related components. This means that a person can be healthy without being fit. Therefore, I believe that for the sedentary individual who wants to change and live life to the full, the coach/trainer should set Fitness as the main goal and not just “Health.”


There have been a lot of variations with regards to the number of Components of Fitness – some say there are as many as 12 while others narrow it down to as few as 4 components. For me, being specific is important to fully understanding the primary goal of achieving Fitness and that there are 11 Components that should be considered with regards to exercise programming. One thing to keep in mind is the Principle of Individuality – for every component each person has a different ‘level of fitness‘ compared to another, and the level to be reached for athletes (ie, ‘high and competitive fitness level’) may be different for regular individuals (average or above average fitness level). For example, some people relate being fit to just body composition and strength, but flexibility should also be targeted even for the office worker to relieve him/her of chronic back pains. However, the target level of flexibility for the sedentary individual would be much lower compared to the target for athletes, like those who train in gymnastics.

Another thing to remember: while it is important to be aware of the specifics, training for these Fitness Components usually overlap and it might not be helpful to over-analyze the training program and develop each component interdependently. A good exercise program whether for athletes or for ordinary individuals would have those components working together, and just focus on a single component to be developed when it seems necessary.

Health-related Components

    1.) Cardio-Respiratory Endurance– the ability of the heart, lungs and blood vessels (Cardiovascular and Respiratory System) to deliver oxygen to the working muscles and remove wastes.

    This component requires the Aerobic (Oxidative) System to provide energy for activities done for prolonged periods (continuous for about an hour and more) and involves the whole body (ie, running, swimming, bicycling). The level of Cardio-Respiratory Endurance can be observed not only by how long a person/athlete can sustain an activity, but also on how fast he/she recovers during rest.

Muscular Endurance.

Muscular Endurance.

    2.) Muscular Endurance– this refers to the local or individual ability of a muscle to sustain work for a prolonged period of time with due fatigue.
    3.) Muscular Strength– this is the ability of the muscles to exert force against a resistance. There are types of Muscular strength: Isometric contraction (resisting force without moving or shortening muscles), Dynamic or Isotonic contraction (ie, pushing, pulling, lifting), and Isokinetic contraction.
    4.) Flexibility– this refers to the continuum of Range of Motion (ROM) that a joint or sequence of joints can fully reach. It can be either static (flexibility without moving) or dynamic (moving a joint through its ROM while doing an activity/sport).
    5.) Body Composition– our body is composed mainly of bone, muscle, and fat. The ratio between the three is essential to knowing the fitness level of an individual, that is, the contrast of the mass of bones, muscle and organs (lean body mass) against body fat. The leanness or fatness of an indiviudal may vary according to one’s somatotype (body type), age, and weight, but there are norms to determine the healthy ratio for a specific person.


    (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

    A significant amount of Flexibility is important even to non-athletes.

    A significant amount of Flexibility is important even to non-athletes.

    Skill-related Components

      6.) Speed– is measured by the distance covered over time, or simply, how fast the body can move quickly in one direction. This is shown in running forward, backpedaling, or side stepping.
      7.) Power– Power is the product of force and speed (Force x Distance/Time). It is the combination of strength and speed which produces the maximal contraction in one explosive act (ex, jumping, throwing).
      8.) Coordination– refers to the ability of the body to control the muscles of the body in a flowing and harmonious way to produce the most efficient desired action. The neuromuscular and musculoskeletal systems work together for an accurate execution of a physical task. This is very important in other skill-related components of Fitness.
      9.) Balance– as the name implies, this is the ability of the body to maintain equilibrium whether in a static (single-leg stand or handstand) or dynamic position. Dynamic balance is essential to any sport.
      10.) Reaction Time– refers to the quickness of the nervous system to respond to an eternal stimuli. The brain receives the stimuli (by the 5 senses) and sends signals to specific muscles to respond appropriately. This will show the worth of repeated practice sessions that cause the muscles to “memorize” the necessary movements.
      11.) Agility– this is the ability to change direction quickly while moving at a fast speed. It is a combination of flexibility, coordination, balance, speed, and power. This can be seen in sports such as tennis, football, basketball, and the likes.
    Sports such as Football utilizes all of the Skill-related Components of Fitness.

    Sports such as Football utilizes all of the Skill-related Components of Fitness.

    Note again that these health and skill related components of Fitness are not discrete – they usually overlap and work with each other. Thus, developing a training program need not to be too specific to address each component individually as long as the exercises and drills work the necessary components required to reach the desired goal for the athlete or client.

     

     

    **********

     

    Get The Body Fat Breakthrough: Tap the Muscle-Building Power of Negative Training and Lose Up to 30 Pounds in 30 Days! from Amazon for your Kindle or iPad for only $9.99.

    $12.09
    Natrol Biotin Maximum Strength 100 Tablets
    Buy now

    $42.79
    Joint MAX Double Strength (120 SOFT CHEWS)
    Buy now

    $44.44
    Webber Naturals® Triple Strength Omega-3 Enteric Coated 900 mg 150softgels (one per day)
    Buy now

    eBook $9.99
    Starting Strength eBook
    Buy now

     

     


    (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});